Wednesday, March 31, 2004

Fruit Processing

Fruit is sometimes defined as the product of growth from an angiosperm, or flowering plant. From a purely botanical point of view, the fruit may be only the fleshy growth that arises from the ovary of a flower and may not necessarily include any other structures. From the consumer's or food processor's point of view, however,

Haworth

Town, Bradford metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, England, overlooking the River Worth and adjoining the town of Keighley. In 1820 the Reverend Patrick Brontë brought his wife and six children—including Charlotte, Emily, and Anne, later of international literary fame—to Haworth. The Church of St. Michael contains

Monday, March 29, 2004

Earphone

Small loudspeaker held or worn close to the listener's ear or within the outer ear. Common forms include the hand-held telephone receiver; the headphone (q.v.), in which one or two earphones are held in place by a band worn over the head; and the plug earphone, which is inserted in the outer opening of the ear. The conversion of electrical to acoustical signals is effected by

Acarnania

District of ancient Greece bounded by the Ionian Sea, the Ambracian Gulf, Mount Thyamus, and the Achelous River. Corinth founded several colonies on the coast of Acarnania in the 7th and 6th centuries BC. Originally a tribal unit, Acarnania developed into a federal state with generals and other magistrates, a council, and an assembly by the late 5th century; its capital was

Sunday, March 28, 2004

Sabre-toothed Cat

Any of the extinct carnivores forming the subfamily Machairodontinae of the cat family, Felidae. Sabre-toothed cats are named for the pair of elongated, bladelike canine teeth they possessed in the upper jaw. They are often called sabre-toothed tigers or sabre-toothed lions, although the lion and tiger are of a different subfamily of felids, the true cats

Saturday, March 27, 2004

Aerospace Industry

The product line of the aerospace industry is, by necessity, broad because its primary products—flight vehicles—require up to millions of individual parts. In addition, many support systems are needed to operate and maintain the vehicles. In terms of sales, military aircraft have the largest market share, followed by space systems and civil aircraft, with missiles

Thursday, March 25, 2004

Asbestos

Town, Estrie region, southern Quebec province, Canada. Asbestos lies near the Southwest Nicolet River, 95 miles (153 km) southwest of Quebec city. Its economy traditionally depended almost entirely on asbestos mining and the manufacture of asbestos products. One of the mines—the Jeffrey open-pit mine—is the largest asbestos mine in the world. Electrical equipment and wood

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

Distress

In law, process that enables a person to seize and detain from a wrongdoer some chattel, or item of personal property, as a pledge for the redressing of an injury, the performance of a duty, or the satisfaction of a demand. Distress was frequently levied without legal process, but requirements have become more stringent and now often necessitate some type of court

Tuesday, March 23, 2004

Avola

Town, Siracusa provincia, southeastern Sicily, Italy, southwest of Syracuse. Rebuilt after an earthquake in 1693, the town has several fine 18th-century churches. Sugar refining and almond packing are the main industries. Pop. (1993 est.) mun., 31,629.

Fracastoro, Girolamo

At the University of Padua Fracastoro was a colleague of the astronomer Copernicus. As a physician, he maintained

Monday, March 22, 2004

Korolenko, Vladimir Galaktionovich

Korolenko was expelled from two colleges for his revolutionary activities. In 1879 he was exiled to the Yakut region (now in Sakha republic) of Siberia, where he encountered the

Sunday, March 21, 2004

Cheng Ch'eng-kung

Cheng Ch'eng-kung was born in a small Japanese coastal town to a Japanese mother and a Chinese father, Cheng Chih-lung, a maritime adventurer who made a fortune through trade and piracy in the Taiwan Straits. Cheng

Friday, March 19, 2004

Alcaeus

Only fragments and quotations from Alcaeus' work survive, but they are enough to show the extent

Thursday, March 18, 2004

Pug

Breed of toy dog that probably originated in China and was introduced to England near the end of the 17th century by Dutch traders. The pug has a short muzzle and a tightly curled tail. It is a squarely built, muscular dog, with a large head, prominent dark eyes, and small, drooping ears. At maturity, it stands 10 to 11 inches (25.5 to 28 centimetres) and weighs about 13 to 18 pounds (6 to 8 kilograms). Its

Wednesday, March 17, 2004

Newhouse, Theodore ("ted")

American publisher who with his brothers founded a publishing empire that grew to comprise such holdings as 26 newspapers, the Condé Nast magazine group, business journals, and cable television systems (b. July 19, 1903, Bayonne, N.J.--d. Nov. 28, 1998, New York, N.Y.).

Chettle, Henry

Chettle began his career as a printer and associated with such literary men as Robert Greene and Thomas Nashe. He prepared for posthumous publication Greenes Groats-Worth of Witte (1592), with its reference to Shakespeare as an “upstart Crow,” but offered Shakespeare compliments

Monday, March 15, 2004

Earth, Relative measurements

For studying Earth structures, instruments that will measure the differences in g from points where g is known are required. They have to be rugged enough to be taken into the field and capable of providing a reading in a matter of a few minutes. Instruments suitable for measuring g on ships at sea also are needed. As long ago as 1849, Sir John Herschel of England proposed an instrument

Sunday, March 14, 2004

Locri Epizephyrii

Also called  Locri  ancient city on the eastern side of the “toe” of Italy, founded by Greeks c. 680 BC; the inhabitants used the name of Locri Epizephyrii to distinguish themselves from the Locri of Greece. Locri Epizephyrii was the first Greek community to have a written code of laws, given by Zaleucus c. 660 BC. Locri Epizephyrii founded colonies, repelled the attacks of Croton during the 6th century,

Haeju

City, southwestern North Korea. Situated on Haeju Bay, facing the Yellow Sea, it is the only port on the west coast of North Korea that does not freeze over in winter. Haeju was the centre for trade with China until the Kyong-Ui rail line, constructed in 1906 from Seoul to Sinuiju, on the border with Manchuria, bypassed it. With the Chaeryong plain (a granary area) nearby and Yonp'yong Island

Saturday, March 13, 2004

Beja

Distrito (“district”), southern Portugal. It is the largest district in Portugal and produces olives, olive oil, wheat, rye, cork, dairy products, and leather goods. There is mining for copper, silver, lead, and zinc near Beja city at the Castro Verde project. In 1974 the Portuguese government initiated an agrarian reform program by which most of the estate holdings of the district

Thursday, March 11, 2004

Resources, Allocation Of

In free-enterprise

Biblical Literature, The Revised Standard Version

The American Standard Version had been an expression of sensitivity to the needs of the American public. At the same time, several individual and unofficial translations into modern speech made from 1885 on had gained popularity, their appeal reinforced by the discovery that the Greek of the New Testament used the common nonliterary variety of the language spoken

Wednesday, March 10, 2004

Amalthaea

In Greek (originally Cretan) mythology, the foster mother of Zeus, king of the gods. She is sometimes represented as the goat that suckled the infant god in a cave in Crete, sometimes as a nymph who fed him the milk of a goat. This goat having broken off one of its horns, Amalthaea filled the horn with flowers and fruits and presented it to Zeus, who, according to one version, placed

Tuesday, March 09, 2004

Karaganda

Oblast (province), central Kazakhstan. It lies mostly in the Kazakh Uplands in a dry steppe zone, rising gradually in elevation eastward to a maximum in the Karkaraly Mountains of 5,115 feet (1,559 m). The principal rivers, the Nura and Sarysu, are in the west, in the Musbel lowland. The climate is continental (tending to extremes) and dry, with severe winters, marked by prolonged snowstorms

Sunday, March 07, 2004

Venda

Also called  Bavenda,   a Bantu-speaking people inhabiting the region of the Republic of South Africa known from 1979 to 1994 as the Republic of Venda. The area is now part of Northern Transvaal province, and is situated in the extreme northeastern corner of South Africa, bordering on southern Zimbabwe. The Venda have been called a “composite people” because they have historically consisted of a multiplicity

Saturday, March 06, 2004

Tasmania, Soils

Most Tasmanian soils are leached, acidic, poorly drained, high in humus, and low in fertility. Least fertile and most extensive are the soils, especially the moor peats, of the west and northeast. Fertile areas occur extensively in the northwest and locally elsewhere, notably in the northeast. Brown earths occupy the drier areas east of the Central Plateau; black earths,

Friday, March 05, 2004

Arisaema

Of the hardy species often planted in the shady wild garden, two are especially familiar. The jack-in-the-pulpit, or Indian turnip (A. triphyllum), native to eastern North America, usually has

Thursday, March 04, 2004

China, Rural collectivization

This transition was most obvious in the countryside. After land reform had been carried out, mutual aid teams allowed the Communists to experiment with voluntary forms of agricultural collectivization. Starting in late 1953, a campaign was launched to organize into small collectives, called lower level agricultural producers' cooperatives, averaging 20 to 30

Wednesday, March 03, 2004

Wanganui River

River in central North Island, New Zealand. It rises on the western slopes of Mount Ngauruhoe and flows northwest to Taumarunui and then south to empty into the Tasman Sea at South Taranaki Bight. Draining a basin of 2,850 square miles (7,380 square km), the Wanganui, 180 miles (290 km) long, is fed by the Ongarue, Tangarakau, and Ohura rivers. A sandbar at its mouth, near Wanganui city, blocks the

Maiquetía

City, northern Distrito Federal, northern Venezuela, on the narrow strip of land between the coastal hills and the Caribbean Sea, just west of La Guaira. It is a leading port of Venezuela and a popular beach resort. Industries include a glass factory, a brewery, and a caustic-soda plant. The city is accessible by highway and expressway from Caracas, 20 miles (30 km) to the south,

Monday, March 01, 2004

Uusimaa

In full  Uudenmaan Lääni , Swedish  Nylands Län  lääni (province), southern Finland, on the Gulf of Finland. Helsinki, the national capital and also the provincial administrative capital, is located midway along the Uusimaa coast. Other important towns include Porvoo (Borgå), Kerava, Lovisa (Loviisa), Hyvinkää, Hangö (Hanko), and Ekenäs (Tammisaari). In some areas the population is mainly Swedish-speaking. The area is low