Sunday, May 30, 2004

Kenai Fjords National Park

The park includes the 300-square-mile (777-square-km) Harding Icefield and its outflowing glaciers and numerous coastal fjords and islands, which are remnants

Friday, May 28, 2004

Zambezi River

The Lozi (Barotse), who dominate much of the upper Zambezi, have taken advantage of the seasonal flooding of the Barotse Plain for centuries and have an agricultural economy that is supplemented by animal husbandry, fishing, and trade. The main groups of the middle Zambezi include the Tonga, Shona, Chewa, and Nsenga peoples, all of whom largely practice subsistence agriculture.

Wednesday, May 26, 2004

Grappelli, Stéphane

French violinist (b. Jan. 26, 1908, Paris, France--d. Dec. 1, 1997, Paris), was one of the few notable jazz improvisers on violin and one of the first popular European jazz musicians; he played with a lilting swing and quick wit that made him an international favourite for over 60 years. With the great Gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt, he formed (1934) the first Quintette du Hot Club de France, a Paris-based

Tuesday, May 25, 2004

Holi

Hindu spring festival celebrated on the full-moon day of Phalguna (February–March). The festival, probably of ancient origin, has many characteristics of a saturnalia. Participants throw coloured waters and powders on one another, and, on this one day only, the usual restrictions of caste, sex, status, and age are disregarded. In the streets the celebrations are often marked

Saturday, May 22, 2004

Nagana

A form of the disease trypanosomiasis (q.v.), occurring chiefly in cattle and horses and caused by several species of the protozoan Trypanosoma. The disease, which occurs in southern and central Africa, is carried from animal to animal chiefly by tsetse flies. Signs of infection include fever, muscular wasting, anemia, and swelling of tissues (edema). There is discharge

Thursday, May 20, 2004

Azov, Sea Of

Russian  Azovskoye More, or Azovskoe More,   inland sea situated off the southern shores of Ukraine and Russia. It forms a northern extension of the Black Sea, to which it is linked on the south by the Kerch Strait. The Sea of Azov is about 210 miles (340 km) long and 85 miles (135 km) wide and has an area of about 14,500 square miles (37,600 square km). Into the Sea of Azov flow the great Don and Kuban rivers and many lesser ones such as the Mius, the Berda,

Tuesday, May 18, 2004

Tabulata

Major division of extinct coral animals found as fossils in Ordovician to Jurassic marine rocks (505 million to 144 million years old). Tabulata is characterized by the presence of interior platforms, or tabulae, and by a general lack of vertical walls, or septa. Colonial masses of these tabulate corals sometimes comprised sizable structures.

Monday, May 17, 2004

Shahi Family

Also called  Shahiya,   dynasty of some 60 rulers who governed the Kabul valley (in Afghanistan) and the old province of Gandhara from the decline of the Kushan empire in the 3rd century AD. The word Shahi, the title of the rulers, is related to the old Kushan form shao, or “king.” The dynasty probably descended from the Kushans, or Turks (Tarushkas). Nothing is recorded of the history of the long line until the last

Friday, May 14, 2004

Dubois, Pierre

French lawyer and political pamphleteer during the reign of Philip IV the Fair; his most important treatise, De recuperatione Terrae Sanctae (1306, “On the Recovery of the Holy Land”), dealt with a wide range of political issues and gave a good picture of contemporary intellectual trends while ostensibly outlining the conditions

Wednesday, May 12, 2004

Hannibal

Hannibal's forces were now totally inadequate to match the army of Scipio, who had rushed to the Po River to protect the recently founded Roman colonies of Placentia (modern Piacenza) and Cremona. The first action between the two armies took place on the plains west of the Ticino River, and Hannibal's Numidian cavalry prevailed. Scipio was severely wounded, and the Romans

Tuesday, May 11, 2004

Bouvard, Alexis

Astronomer and director of the Paris Observatory, who is noted for discovering eight comets and writing Tables astronomiques of Jupiter and Saturn (1808) and of Uranus (1821). Bouvard's tables accurately predicted orbital locations of Jupiter and Saturn, but his tables for Uranus failed, leading him to hypothesize that irregularities in Uranus'

Sunday, May 09, 2004

Performing Arts, Germany.

Two notable films in a generally undistinguished year were Winfried Bonengel's Führer Ex, a dramatic investigation of contemporary neo-Nazism, seen as a legacy of communist oppression in the former East Germany, and Eoin Moore's Pigs Will Fly, a battered-wife story that observed the unhappy relationship through the psychology of the husband, himself a painfully

Wednesday, May 05, 2004

War Finance

Government efforts to finance major wars have frequently led to major changes in the tax system. In the United States, for example, the importance

Monday, May 03, 2004

Ah Kin

(Mayan: “He of the Sun”), the regular clergy of the Yucatec Maya in pre-Columbian times. The Ah Kin are best known historically for their performance in the ritual sacrifice of victims, whose hearts were offered to the Mayan gods. The chief priest (Ah Kin Mai) served in the various capacities of administrator, teacher, healer, astronomer, adviser to the chief, and diviner. Priests